viktor_haag: (Default)
I really don't want to move to your "spanky new friends page" option.

Frankly, if you want to spend developer time on making the LJ experience better, I'd far prefer you work on these two simple tasks first:

- Proper support for MarkDown syntax in comment editing, as opposed to the limited set of HTML you offer now. Would it be uncomfortable for existing users? Perhaps. But it would be better and they'd learn to love it

- In place dynamic preview of said MarkDown comment editing.

You know what the StackExchange sites do for their input controls? That works. Do that.
viktor_haag: (Default)
"Anything that impinges on Ireland's competitiveness is going to be a big thing for Google, including corporation tax." John Herlihy (head Google Ireland)

Perhaps the Don't Be Evil Dublin local office is just trying to figure out how it's going to pay for that 10% pay-rise they handed their 2,000 employees. Oh, and DBE (Dublin) is apparently not the only ones trying to run the local government. Intel (4,000 employees) is also getting antsy.

The Germans are, apparently, fully behind Ireland's "courageous [proposed] reform policies". Wow. Good for you, Deutschland. But, it might be a great idea if you made your press release sound a teeny bit less like "I've called you all here to tell you that I'm giving a vote of full confidence in our head coaching staff" or "We're waiting for the Dail to approve a rate increase so that more companies decide that working in the rest of Europe, including beautiful Germany, is an awesome idea".

PS -- Ms Merkel's press relations: anyone who's watched "Yes, Minister" or "Yes, Prime Minister" knows damn well what the adjective "courageous" really means in neuvo-politico...
viktor_haag: (Default)
"Anything that impinges on Ireland's competitiveness is going to be a big thing for Google, including corporation tax." John Herlihy (head Google Ireland)

Perhaps the Don't Be Evil Dublin local office is just trying to figure out how it's going to pay for that 10% pay-rise they handed their 2,000 employees. Oh, and DBE (Dublin) is apparently not the only ones trying to run the local government. Intel (4,000 employees) is also getting antsy.

The Germans are, apparently, fully behind Ireland's "courageous [proposed] reform policies". Wow. Good for you, Deutschland. But, it might be a great idea if you made your press release sound a teeny bit less like "I've called you all here to tell you that I'm giving a vote of full confidence in our head coaching staff" or "We're waiting for the Dail to approve a rate increase so that more companies decide that working in the rest of Europe, including beautiful Germany, is an awesome idea".

PS -- Ms Merkel's press relations: anyone who's watched "Yes, Minister" or "Yes, Prime Minister" knows damn well what the adjective "courageous" really means in neuvo-politico...
viktor_haag: (Default)
Originally noted by [livejournal.com profile] james_nicoll was PZ Myers' broadside at Kurzweil.

It appears that Kurzweil has, inevitably I suppose, fired back: in summary, "I'm not the jackass you made me out to be."
viktor_haag: (Default)
Originally noted by [livejournal.com profile] james_nicoll was PZ Myers' broadside at Kurzweil.

It appears that Kurzweil has, inevitably I suppose, fired back: in summary, "I'm not the jackass you made me out to be."
viktor_haag: (Default)
I love the contrast in these two recent reports on the Register:

Google unveils new version of Android, supporting Flash, because "[i]t turns out that on the internet, people use Flash".

Google, pressed with concerns about Android's power management (battery life), blames third party software developers for "using the phone's radio capabilities too much".

Umm, Google. It turns out that, on mobile cellular networks, people use their mobile devices' radios.
viktor_haag: (Default)
I love the contrast in these two recent reports on the Register:

Google unveils new version of Android, supporting Flash, because "[i]t turns out that on the internet, people use Flash".

Google, pressed with concerns about Android's power management (battery life), blames third party software developers for "using the phone's radio capabilities too much".

Umm, Google. It turns out that, on mobile cellular networks, people use their mobile devices' radios.
viktor_haag: (Default)
It sucks that you let people use Flash to provide clips with excessive volume levels without providing users with a volume control (effing advertisements 90% of the time). It also sucks that you cant seem to store a user's preferred initial volume level locally, and think that "oh, I don't know, as loud as we can!" is the best place to start.

I may not agree with Steve, but you're not winning any friends either, with this consistently appearing annoyance.
viktor_haag: (Default)
It sucks that you let people use Flash to provide clips with excessive volume levels without providing users with a volume control (effing advertisements 90% of the time). It also sucks that you cant seem to store a user's preferred initial volume level locally, and think that "oh, I don't know, as loud as we can!" is the best place to start.

I may not agree with Steve, but you're not winning any friends either, with this consistently appearing annoyance.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Granted, the fine tagged to the law is "only" 100 euro, but frankly the precedent here rather bothers me.

If, while I'm on vacation for a few days, some weasel sneaks onto my property and leeches electricity out of an out-door outlet for some kriminal purpose, I should be liable because I didn't "properly secure my out-door outlet"?

I suppose the answer now is, yes.

I can see that I have a community obligation not to leave cans of gas lying around on my front lawn where anyone could set fire to them (or steal them and use them to set fire to something), baskets of kitchen knives, and so on and so forth.

I suppose the Germans would like to think that this community obligation towards safeguarding my "potentially dangerous civic resources" extends to my WiFi access point to the intarwebz.

Hrm.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Granted, the fine tagged to the law is "only" 100 euro, but frankly the precedent here rather bothers me.

If, while I'm on vacation for a few days, some weasel sneaks onto my property and leeches electricity out of an out-door outlet for some kriminal purpose, I should be liable because I didn't "properly secure my out-door outlet"?

I suppose the answer now is, yes.

I can see that I have a community obligation not to leave cans of gas lying around on my front lawn where anyone could set fire to them (or steal them and use them to set fire to something), baskets of kitchen knives, and so on and so forth.

I suppose the Germans would like to think that this community obligation towards safeguarding my "potentially dangerous civic resources" extends to my WiFi access point to the intarwebz.

Hrm.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Me moving my mouse pointer quickly over your teeny square-inchage of my displayed computing environment does not constitute any kind of interest whatsoever on the product or service you're flashing up in front of my face. My click can barely constitute such interest, but I'm comfortable establishing that as the protocol by which you're allowed to try to show me more.

Take your effing pop-up animated flash movies and bury them behind a click, please.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Me moving my mouse pointer quickly over your teeny square-inchage of my displayed computing environment does not constitute any kind of interest whatsoever on the product or service you're flashing up in front of my face. My click can barely constitute such interest, but I'm comfortable establishing that as the protocol by which you're allowed to try to show me more.

Take your effing pop-up animated flash movies and bury them behind a click, please.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Frankly, I see little point in having my Google-aware net-presence aggregated into their Buzz tool. This may be the thin edge of the luddite wedge, but at the moment I can't be bothered to cultivate my Buzz activity. I have, therefore, nuked my Buzz profile: now, if Google would be so kind as to remove its appendage from my mail page, that'd be groovy.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Frankly, I see little point in having my Google-aware net-presence aggregated into their Buzz tool. This may be the thin edge of the luddite wedge, but at the moment I can't be bothered to cultivate my Buzz activity. I have, therefore, nuked my Buzz profile: now, if Google would be so kind as to remove its appendage from my mail page, that'd be groovy.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Every now and then, some boffin takes a decent UI and does something to it that seems like a good idea, and then just plants their own head straight into the table.

Viz.

Amazon used to be:
- CMD+L, type 'amazon.ca', wait a few seconds
- TAB
- type someSearchCriteria
- ENTER, wait a second
- behold the glory

Now, some web-wizard has changed the way the form selection order on their homepage works. Their search bar's drop-down list of "departments" now responds to the TAB key. And, what's worse, the list doesn't wrap.

The effect? Now a keyboard user cannot get to the search bar to type in their search criteria, without having to hit TAB n times first, where n equals the number of their departments plus one.

Oh, and you can't search for anything from keyboard only, without having to search in the last department on the list when what nearly all keyboard users are going to want to do is search "all departments" because these folks have long since discovered that they can stick in a keyword in their search criteria to indicate the department they want.

Gah.

Any UI that forces me to move my hand to the mouse when I don't want to gets a very dim scowl from yours truly.

Listen, chuckles: please don't build ultra-sexy UI controls into your website that do not respond in the way that is industry standard. Drop-down selection lists in web browsers work more or less the same way: TAB key can focus them, but another TAB will move the focus on to the next control! While the list has the focus, ENTER will open the list, and keyboard letters will seek to list items that match!

Your sexy new control is not "hot new innovation". It sticks latency and frustration between you and your customers. Which might just reduce their desire to use your site. And might just slow them down enough to decide that, no thanks, the complete works of William Shakespeare are not the impulse buy they must make today.

All this could have been very neatly solved if they would just have placed the focus-cycling order of the text input field for their search criteria, before their sexy new drop down list. Did they even bother to field test their UI changes before unleashing it on the web-i-verse? Probably not.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Every now and then, some boffin takes a decent UI and does something to it that seems like a good idea, and then just plants their own head straight into the table.

Viz.

Amazon used to be:
- CMD+L, type 'amazon.ca', wait a few seconds
- TAB
- type someSearchCriteria
- ENTER, wait a second
- behold the glory

Now, some web-wizard has changed the way the form selection order on their homepage works. Their search bar's drop-down list of "departments" now responds to the TAB key. And, what's worse, the list doesn't wrap.

The effect? Now a keyboard user cannot get to the search bar to type in their search criteria, without having to hit TAB n times first, where n equals the number of their departments plus one.

Oh, and you can't search for anything from keyboard only, without having to search in the last department on the list when what nearly all keyboard users are going to want to do is search "all departments" because these folks have long since discovered that they can stick in a keyword in their search criteria to indicate the department they want.

Gah.

Any UI that forces me to move my hand to the mouse when I don't want to gets a very dim scowl from yours truly.

Listen, chuckles: please don't build ultra-sexy UI controls into your website that do not respond in the way that is industry standard. Drop-down selection lists in web browsers work more or less the same way: TAB key can focus them, but another TAB will move the focus on to the next control! While the list has the focus, ENTER will open the list, and keyboard letters will seek to list items that match!

Your sexy new control is not "hot new innovation". It sticks latency and frustration between you and your customers. Which might just reduce their desire to use your site. And might just slow them down enough to decide that, no thanks, the complete works of William Shakespeare are not the impulse buy they must make today.

All this could have been very neatly solved if they would just have placed the focus-cycling order of the text input field for their search criteria, before their sexy new drop down list. Did they even bother to field test their UI changes before unleashing it on the web-i-verse? Probably not.
viktor_haag: (Default)
I have a small number of DW activation codes available for them that wants, and don't yet have. Requests in comments can be serviced as a FIFO.
viktor_haag: (Default)
I have a small number of DW activation codes available for them that wants, and don't yet have. Requests in comments can be serviced as a FIFO.
viktor_haag: (Default)
My up-to-this-point-rock-solid-reliable G5 at work this morning evidenced hardware weirdness which falls solidly into the not good at all behaviour.

I got blithely informed today by TimeMachine that it hadn't done a backup in 10 days. I took this with a big dose of salt, but went digging. It appears that my external HDD had become invisible to my desktop. The HDD being less than two years old, this set off all sorts of warning bells in my head.

After blowing my entire morning with some finicky cross checking with my laptop, and a newly purchased (ouch) external HDD, it appears that the FireWire bus on my desktop may be No Longer Functional™.

Luckily, the drive is "only" a TimeMachine backup drive, so all my primary data is sitting, still, on the internal HDDs in the computer.

But now I'm two hundred bucks lighter, having bought a new backup drive, and I'm also receiving warning signs of the impending mortality of my reliable work computer. A problem with the FireWire bus could very well signify impending motherboard badness, and that would be a sad state of affairs indeed.

And I've been unable to locate the receipt for the old HDD, so despite it being still within the warranty period.... grrrr...

Having just req'd a new laptop (non-Mac) from my employer, I suspect that, should my desktop die within the next year, I will be rather gently informed that my computing budget has already been spent, and I won't be getting a replacement desktop... and that means for the first time in almost a decade, I'll be back in Windows land at work (aiiieeee).

Please, spirit-of-macintosh, keep my desktop alive long enough for me to req your replacement when you finally kick over! Please!

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