viktor_haag: (Default)
The Red Hood!For years, MIgnola has been my favourite illustrator in the comics arena, more even than Hergé (for years the reigning champion) and Guy Davis. His command of composition and his energy can be a bit sledge-hammery, but it accords so well with my tastes that I rarely see a piece that I don't like.

A recent tilt of his at providing a splash, re-imagined cover for a significant DC Comics anniversary1 is a wonderful example of his excellence.

He still can't draw feet, but, really, who notices?

--
1<http://dcu.blog.dccomics.com/files/2010/05/bm_cv700_variant-copy.jpg>
viktor_haag: (Default)
The Red Hood!For years, MIgnola has been my favourite illustrator in the comics arena, more even than Hergé (for years the reigning champion) and Guy Davis. His command of composition and his energy can be a bit sledge-hammery, but it accords so well with my tastes that I rarely see a piece that I don't like.

A recent tilt of his at providing a splash, re-imagined cover for a significant DC Comics anniversary1 is a wonderful example of his excellence.

He still can't draw feet, but, really, who notices?

--
1<http://dcu.blog.dccomics.com/files/2010/05/bm_cv700_variant-copy.jpg>
viktor_haag: (Default)
That's it. You will never, ever get another kind word from me again, you bastard Frank Miller. There was a time, only a short while ago, when I would have defended some of your earlier work. At this point, I'm thinking very, very seriously about taking every single one of your trades, and bunging them in the recycle bin, so they can be shredded and turned into warm coats for under-privileged children.

I'm a bit relieved that the great Eisner did not survive long enough to see your apparent travesty.

On the other hand, I also have to believe (for my own sanity) that, were he still alive, you would not have been let within a single country mile of his beloved creation.

Shame on the managers of Eisner's estate for letting you shamble near! Shame on you for sullying one of the pillars of North America's comic history!
viktor_haag: (Default)
That's it. You will never, ever get another kind word from me again, you bastard Frank Miller. There was a time, only a short while ago, when I would have defended some of your earlier work. At this point, I'm thinking very, very seriously about taking every single one of your trades, and bunging them in the recycle bin, so they can be shredded and turned into warm coats for under-privileged children.

I'm a bit relieved that the great Eisner did not survive long enough to see your apparent travesty.

On the other hand, I also have to believe (for my own sanity) that, were he still alive, you would not have been let within a single country mile of his beloved creation.

Shame on the managers of Eisner's estate for letting you shamble near! Shame on you for sullying one of the pillars of North America's comic history!
viktor_haag: (Default)
Yeah, sure, it's a paid spot. Yeah, sure, Perlman's makeup is not quite as good as it is in the movie. But it's cheekiness like this that makes me appreciate James Lipton. Not nearly as good as his paste-job on K-Fed, but still, humorous.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Yeah, sure, it's a paid spot. Yeah, sure, Perlman's makeup is not quite as good as it is in the movie. But it's cheekiness like this that makes me appreciate James Lipton. Not nearly as good as his paste-job on K-Fed, but still, humorous.
viktor_haag: (Default)
This seems to have turned into a meme. While I rarely participate in these sorts of things, sometimes I do, so here I go.




My dentist office used to have little digests that included reprints of the adventures of Tintin, done in black and white. The one I remember earliest was either The Black Island or King Ottokar's Sceptre, I'm not sure which one. I'm choosing this one, because I think it's one of the best comic book covers ever made. Hergé was a visual genius.


Yoinked from [livejournal.com profile] judd_sonofbert and [livejournal.com profile] thebitterguy.
viktor_haag: (Default)
This seems to have turned into a meme. While I rarely participate in these sorts of things, sometimes I do, so here I go.




My dentist office used to have little digests that included reprints of the adventures of Tintin, done in black and white. The one I remember earliest was either The Black Island or King Ottokar's Sceptre, I'm not sure which one. I'm choosing this one, because I think it's one of the best comic book covers ever made. Hergé was a visual genius.


Yoinked from [livejournal.com profile] judd_sonofbert and [livejournal.com profile] thebitterguy.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Apparently, Dark Horse Comics is bringing back Gor. Why? (Well, the obvious answer is, "because it will sell books", but jeez, couldn't they have picked something else? I'm not a huge devotee of the Sword & Sorcery genre, but I do like some of it, and I can't help but feel certain that there are better authors' works that could have been rescued from the dusty backroom of the used book store than John Freaking Norman.)
viktor_haag: (Default)
Apparently, Dark Horse Comics is bringing back Gor. Why? (Well, the obvious answer is, "because it will sell books", but jeez, couldn't they have picked something else? I'm not a huge devotee of the Sword & Sorcery genre, but I do like some of it, and I can't help but feel certain that there are better authors' works that could have been rescued from the dusty backroom of the used book store than John Freaking Norman.)
viktor_haag: (Default)
I note several things:

(a) I spend much much less on comics these days than I used to.

(b) I actually read only a handful of titles (and by handful, I mean maybe four or five), and for only two of those do I buy single issues (Hellboy and BPRD).

(c) Have comics always been this blatantly sexist?

I'm coming to the sad conclusion that Greg Land is the rule not the exception (ed: yes, I know that link doesn't produce an example of Land's work, but the subtext is similar).

Bah.
viktor_haag: (Default)
I note several things:

(a) I spend much much less on comics these days than I used to.

(b) I actually read only a handful of titles (and by handful, I mean maybe four or five), and for only two of those do I buy single issues (Hellboy and BPRD).

(c) Have comics always been this blatantly sexist?

I'm coming to the sad conclusion that Greg Land is the rule not the exception (ed: yes, I know that link doesn't produce an example of Land's work, but the subtext is similar).

Bah.
viktor_haag: (Default)
And it looks fine. The production values are good (although the layouts are not quite as good as Godlike, the physical quality of the book seems a bit better), the art ranges from excellently evocative to "why did they buy this illo and put it here?" The game's mechancs are pretty much Godlike with a few tweaks learned through playtesting. So, if you liked the basic mechanics of Godlike, then you'll likely appreciate them here as well.

The world support material in the back seems reasonable. Ken Hite has written a long section for this book about creating a super-hero world. It's contents won't necessarily surprise anyone, but he has a handy way of putting a variety of interesting tidbits in one place, next to one another, and explaining things in a clear and cogent manner.

I'm a fan of Detwiller's projects, so I was willing to support Godlike (although it's highly likely I'll never actually play it). Wild Talents' more generic nature raises the chances that it'll see my table, but I can't help but wonder if Arc Dream has horribly missed their marketing window for this game. When Godlike first arrived and Wild Talents was a rumoured "next step", it might have found a niche to occupy.

But, of late, we seem to have an abundance of superhero games on the market: Champions/HERO (which Steve Long seems to be dragging into a golden age by sheer force of will alone), Mutants & Masterminds (wildly popular by all accounts, and pretty much "the game you play if you don't play Champions"), Truth & Justice (the comic book hero game for the small press crowd), Capes (a very interesting mixture of a rolegame, storygame, and a boardgame with no board), With Great Power (a Silver Age story game filled with angst-a-popping). Indeed, it wasn't too long ago that one could still get copies of Silver Age Sentinels (probably still some copies sitting on retailer shelves somewhere), Blood Of Heroes (DC Heroes mechanics re-presented with a quite badly done new background), even an Authority tri-stat game (probably somewhat harder to source at this point than SAS).

With all this existing choice, what does Wild Talents have to offer that's new and different?

The cruel answer is, I just don't really know. And the book itself seems a bit mum on the subject.

There was a fair bit of pent-up demand for Wild Talents in the Godlike fan community, but beyond that, I'm not sure anyone has this book on its radar.

Of course, Mr Hite will probably make mention of it in an Out Of The Box column at some point as, after all, he did contribute to the book. That might get the book some exposure. From all accounts of the playtesters, the One Roll Engine mechanics created by Greg Stolze are serviceable enough.

My pessimistic side believes that Wild Talents will probably vanish beneath the waves of time: I'm not even sure we'll see another print run beyond the run done to fill the pre-orders plus copies printed to fill out an economic batch printing size. Which would be sad, as a lot of care went into this game and it's a reasonably fine looking book (in the same way that old Pagan Press' supplements for CoC were obviously well-put-together labours of love). I'm just not sure it really has enough customer appeal at this point, despite its good qualities.

How many people will throw over their Champions, M&M, or T&J campaign to pick up this game? I fear the answer will be "not too many at all".
viktor_haag: (Default)
And it looks fine. The production values are good (although the layouts are not quite as good as Godlike, the physical quality of the book seems a bit better), the art ranges from excellently evocative to "why did they buy this illo and put it here?" The game's mechancs are pretty much Godlike with a few tweaks learned through playtesting. So, if you liked the basic mechanics of Godlike, then you'll likely appreciate them here as well.

The world support material in the back seems reasonable. Ken Hite has written a long section for this book about creating a super-hero world. It's contents won't necessarily surprise anyone, but he has a handy way of putting a variety of interesting tidbits in one place, next to one another, and explaining things in a clear and cogent manner.

I'm a fan of Detwiller's projects, so I was willing to support Godlike (although it's highly likely I'll never actually play it). Wild Talents' more generic nature raises the chances that it'll see my table, but I can't help but wonder if Arc Dream has horribly missed their marketing window for this game. When Godlike first arrived and Wild Talents was a rumoured "next step", it might have found a niche to occupy.

But, of late, we seem to have an abundance of superhero games on the market: Champions/HERO (which Steve Long seems to be dragging into a golden age by sheer force of will alone), Mutants & Masterminds (wildly popular by all accounts, and pretty much "the game you play if you don't play Champions"), Truth & Justice (the comic book hero game for the small press crowd), Capes (a very interesting mixture of a rolegame, storygame, and a boardgame with no board), With Great Power (a Silver Age story game filled with angst-a-popping). Indeed, it wasn't too long ago that one could still get copies of Silver Age Sentinels (probably still some copies sitting on retailer shelves somewhere), Blood Of Heroes (DC Heroes mechanics re-presented with a quite badly done new background), even an Authority tri-stat game (probably somewhat harder to source at this point than SAS).

With all this existing choice, what does Wild Talents have to offer that's new and different?

The cruel answer is, I just don't really know. And the book itself seems a bit mum on the subject.

There was a fair bit of pent-up demand for Wild Talents in the Godlike fan community, but beyond that, I'm not sure anyone has this book on its radar.

Of course, Mr Hite will probably make mention of it in an Out Of The Box column at some point as, after all, he did contribute to the book. That might get the book some exposure. From all accounts of the playtesters, the One Roll Engine mechanics created by Greg Stolze are serviceable enough.

My pessimistic side believes that Wild Talents will probably vanish beneath the waves of time: I'm not even sure we'll see another print run beyond the run done to fill the pre-orders plus copies printed to fill out an economic batch printing size. Which would be sad, as a lot of care went into this game and it's a reasonably fine looking book (in the same way that old Pagan Press' supplements for CoC were obviously well-put-together labours of love). I'm just not sure it really has enough customer appeal at this point, despite its good qualities.

How many people will throw over their Champions, M&M, or T&J campaign to pick up this game? I fear the answer will be "not too many at all".
viktor_haag: (Default)
... It looks like the marketing wonks at Warner are back to their "one brave nation of perfectly formed warriors fighting for freedom" messaging in promoting 300.

Now I'm not so sure I'll be able to stomach the neo-con subtext in this film enough to really enjoy how pretty it looks in spots (from the trailer).

The increased female presence in the trailer (such as it is) also does little to dispel Mr Miller's well-earned reputation as Purveyor of Fine Whore-Nuns To The World.

::sigh::
viktor_haag: (Default)
... It looks like the marketing wonks at Warner are back to their "one brave nation of perfectly formed warriors fighting for freedom" messaging in promoting 300.

Now I'm not so sure I'll be able to stomach the neo-con subtext in this film enough to really enjoy how pretty it looks in spots (from the trailer).

The increased female presence in the trailer (such as it is) also does little to dispel Mr Miller's well-earned reputation as Purveyor of Fine Whore-Nuns To The World.

::sigh::
viktor_haag: (Default)
In an interesting move, SciFi.com is offering their Amazing Screw On Head pilot for free viewing on the intarweb.

It's hard to describe how much a fan of Mike Mignola I am (probably somewhere just south of "ravening fan boy" but west of "best comic creator of all time"), so, understand, I'm biased.

The video quality is, errmmm, crappy. And I'm not sure the pilot will have wide enough appeal to justify a full series. But, hey, Aeon Flux managed enough episodes for a full DVD set, so here's hoping.

And David Hyde Pierce voicing "the evil villain", Paul Giamatti voicing the 'Head, and Molly Shannon voicing the sadly undead girlfriend? Cool.

Please watch this and then vote positively so SciFi will put episodes into production! I want to be able to add this to my Mignola collection two years from now.

That is all.

-30-
viktor_haag: (Default)
In an interesting move, SciFi.com is offering their Amazing Screw On Head pilot for free viewing on the intarweb.

It's hard to describe how much a fan of Mike Mignola I am (probably somewhere just south of "ravening fan boy" but west of "best comic creator of all time"), so, understand, I'm biased.

The video quality is, errmmm, crappy. And I'm not sure the pilot will have wide enough appeal to justify a full series. But, hey, Aeon Flux managed enough episodes for a full DVD set, so here's hoping.

And David Hyde Pierce voicing "the evil villain", Paul Giamatti voicing the 'Head, and Molly Shannon voicing the sadly undead girlfriend? Cool.

Please watch this and then vote positively so SciFi will put episodes into production! I want to be able to add this to my Mignola collection two years from now.

That is all.

-30-
viktor_haag: (Default)
Ran across this blog post written by a woman named Karen Healey. In it she muses about Whedon's tendency to (a) be a lot more careful with his girl characters than his women characters, and (b) to mete out grim outcomes for 'grown up' females in his series, especially those who are 'sexually independent'. I hope that's a fair summary, but perhaps reading the original article and associated comments is a better way to get a real picture about the detail of her point (and the associated conversation).

I skimmed, I did not read in detail, but I still couldn't help having this thought almost immediately: "Hold on a minute. How, really, is what happens to Whedon's 'women' any different than what happens to Whedon's 'men'?"

I was quite hard pressed, actually, to see any happy futures for any adults in any of Whedon's work. I'm not convinced off the hop that the list of 'happy ended women' in Buffy/Angel/FireFly/Fray/AmazingXMen isn't every bit as small as the list of 'happy ended men'.

In short, I'm not sure Whedon is so much a closet misogynist as he is a closet misanthropist.

However, I'm not really sure I have the energy to propose this idea and carry through with discussion in Karen's own comment space.

So, this post is more of an observation, really, or a musing, and not necessarily a call for debate. But feel happy to comment if you want to.
viktor_haag: (Default)
Ran across this blog post written by a woman named Karen Healey. In it she muses about Whedon's tendency to (a) be a lot more careful with his girl characters than his women characters, and (b) to mete out grim outcomes for 'grown up' females in his series, especially those who are 'sexually independent'. I hope that's a fair summary, but perhaps reading the original article and associated comments is a better way to get a real picture about the detail of her point (and the associated conversation).

I skimmed, I did not read in detail, but I still couldn't help having this thought almost immediately: "Hold on a minute. How, really, is what happens to Whedon's 'women' any different than what happens to Whedon's 'men'?"

I was quite hard pressed, actually, to see any happy futures for any adults in any of Whedon's work. I'm not convinced off the hop that the list of 'happy ended women' in Buffy/Angel/FireFly/Fray/AmazingXMen isn't every bit as small as the list of 'happy ended men'.

In short, I'm not sure Whedon is so much a closet misogynist as he is a closet misanthropist.

However, I'm not really sure I have the energy to propose this idea and carry through with discussion in Karen's own comment space.

So, this post is more of an observation, really, or a musing, and not necessarily a call for debate. But feel happy to comment if you want to.

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